I made this yesterday. Wow – was it good! Definitely 5 Spoons!

Recipe from America’s Test Kitchen’s Slow Cooker Revolution

Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients:

  • 3 (15-ounce) cans white or yellow hominy, drained and rinsed
  • 3 cups low-sodium chicken broth, plus extra as needed
  • 3 onions, minced
  • 1/4 cup tomato paste
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 6 medium garlic cloves, minced (about 2 tablespoons)
  • 2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh oregano leaves or 2 teaspoons dried
  • 1 (14.5-ounce) can diced tomatoes
  • 4-lb boneless pork butt roast, trimmed, cut into 1½-inch pieces (often labeled as boneless Boston butt)
  • 1/3 cup soy sauce
  • Salt and ground black pepper
  • 1 pound carrots (about 6 medium), peeled, halved lengthwise, and sliced 1 inch thick
  • 1/4 cup minced fresh cilantro leaves
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice

Directions:
1. Puree 1 can hominy and 2 cups broth in a blender until smooth, 1 to 2 minutes; transfer to slow cooker.
2. Microwave onions, tomato paste, 3 tablespoons oil, garlic, chili powder, and oregano together on high power, stirring occasionally, until onions are softened, about 5 minutes; transfer to slow cooker.
3. Stir remaining 2 cans hominy, remaining cup broth, tomatoes with juice, and soy sauce into slow cooker. Season pork with salt and pepper and nestle into slow cooker. Toss carrots with remaining tablespoon oil, season with salt and pepper, and wrap in an aluminum foil packet. Lay foil packet on top of stew. Cover and cook until the pork is tender, 9 to 11 hours on low or 5 to 7 hours on high.
4. Transfer foil packet to plate. Let stew settle for 5 minutes, then remove fat from surface using a large spoon. Carefully open foil packet (watch for steam) and stir carrots with accumulated juice into stew. Let sit until heated through, about 5 minutes. (Adjust stew consistency with additional hot broth as needed.) Stir in cilantro and lime juice, season with salt and pepper to taste, and serve.

You may want to serve with lime wedges, minced fresh cilantro, minced onion or scallions, diced avocado, shredded cheddar or Monterey Jack cheese, sour cream, rice, and/or warmed tortillas.

Evaluation:  In step 1, I pureed the chicken broth and canned hominy together. It was easy to do and resulted in a nice, thick, and flavorful base for the stew. I wish I could have found Juanita’s hominy at our store. It is a brand of Mexican-style hominy said to be lower in carbohydrates and especially delicious. I will be looking for it in the future and plan to buy a few cans to keep on hand.

For the next step I used a bag of frozen onions instead of chopping fresh ones myself. I concluded that one bag was equal to 3 medium onions. Using the frozen onions was easy, and I was perfectly happy with the results. Cooking these ingredients together in the microwave instead of sautéing them on the stove is a great technique.

For step 3, I added only one can of hominy instead of two in an attempt to cut down on the carb-count, and I used a three-pound roast to save some money, yet I still felt that the resulting stew had a very generous amount of meat. The most difficult part of this recipe for me was cutting the pork up. I always find cutting raw meat to be distasteful. I prepared and enclosed the  carrots in a foil packet as instructed and was very pleased with the outcome. The carrots were cooked perfectly. I will try to remember in the future to use this technique for carrots when using the slow cooker. I wonder if it would be good for other vegetables as well.

Since I wanted the stew to be ready to eat in less time than suggested, I decided to try pre-heating the broth, hominy, and tomatoes in the microwave before putting them into the slow cooker. I set the slow-cooker on high and was pleased to find that the pre-heating did speed things up quite a bit. The stew was ready to eat in just under four hours instead of 5 to 7.

Step 4 – There was not much accumulated fat to be removed, but I did spoon off what I could. The stew’s consistency was fine, so I did not add any broth. I don’t like the flavor of cilantro, so I left that out, but I did add the lime juice at the end. It was fun to squeeze the fresh lime (cost was only 33 cents), and I think it added a nice touch of flavor. I think toppings of diced avocado and sour cream would have been a great way to serve the stew. I’ll try to do that next time.

With its deep and rich combination of flavors, Dandy husband and I both liked this stew very much. It truly was delicious. Give it a try. I think you’ll like it.

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